How to Win at Online Slots Games

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Being a winning slot machine player is impossible. All slot machines are specifically designed in order to give the house a long term edge, so the house will always come out ahead if you play long enough. The only real way to counteract the house edge on slot machine games is to play a game with a really big jackpot, bet the max every time you play, and hope that you hit the jackpot. Then when you do hit the really big jackpot, guess what you do next? Stop playing that game.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t play slot machines. In fact, I think slot games, especially the really good ones, are a lot of fun. But you want to keep in the forefront of your mind that mathematically, what you’re doing when you’re playing a slot machine on a long term basis is paying for entertainment. You can calculate how much you’re paying for that entertainment by multiplying the house edge times your average bet times your number of spins per hour.

For example, if you’re playing a slot game with a payout of 95%, then the house edge is 5%. (The casino keeps 5% of every bet you make long term.) And if you’re average bet is $3, then you’re going to pay an average of 15 cents per spin to the house. (5% times $3.) Assuming you’re making 500 spins per hour, that game costs you $75/hour to play, which may or may not be a reasonable price for you entertainment. That depends on your bankroll.

Something else to factor into your calculation is how much the perks and bonuses you’re getting back from the casino are worth. If you’re playing in a land-based casino where you’re getting free drinks while you play, then you can subtract the cost of those drinks from you’re hourly cost. (Or you can add the cost of those drinks to the value of the entertainment you’re receiving–it’s just a matter of perspective.) My recommendation is to drink top-shelf liquor and premium beers in order to maximize the entertainment value you’re receiving. A Heineken can cost $4 a bottle in a nice restaurant. Drink two Heinekens an hour, and you’ve just lowered what it costs you to play each hour from $75 to $68.

Slot clubs also give back a percentage of your losses each hour, so definitely be sure you join the casino’s slot club and ALWAYS use your card to track your play. There’s absolutely no reason not to do this. Casinos also reward their larger slot players with comps like meals, show tickets, and free rooms, which all add up to reduce the amount of money you’re spending each hour that you’re playing on their machine.

So how to be a winning slot machine player? I’d sum it up by saying know how much it’s costing you to play each spin and each hour, take advantage of all the comps and the perks, and go for the big progressive jackpot.

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Does Karate Really Help Longevity? Why Does Data Not Support It Across 118 Masters

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There has now been a study done on the issue of longevity across karate styles in concert with data crunching by a University of South Australia academic. It was done as karate is perceived by practitioners as lifespan extending, however the sport and art is unique in a number of ways given its injury rate, life-long stresses and training culture. So given that the vast majority of karate-ka that have been polled over the years believe that the art fosters a long life, highlighting the stereotype of a ‘Yoda’ like old and wise master, it was worth re-visiting as this may not in fact be the reality.

The study involved:

– multiple doctors spanning medical research, clinicians a psychologist & karate practitioners

– data that shows that lifelong karate practice in different styles has different effects on lifespan, including:

– regional effects (East, West, post WWII until today & comparisons to karate-ka born in the 1800s)

– differing types of inflammation and how it possibly ties to karate longevity

– sparring, drills, ude tanren and kata like sanchin how do each of them really impact longevity

– dojo cultural considerations

– the effect of the developed karate persona & combative environments on longevity

In particular the data shows that all karate styles’ masters, on average, die young since WWII. However the exploration of the many variables and links to style types as well as noting some differences is key (and evidence based practice approach by region, style and era). For example, the data for the masters who lived in the 1800s is somewhat unique, and attributes of training today provides possibilities as to why that it is the case. Data spanned 118 karate masters (8th dans, style founders, style successors etc.) to analyse the links to shortened lifespan in karate styles and factored in: injury rates, diets in regions, psychology and combative factors and stance/practice types.

In some ways the general idea of this existed in the 1800s despite today’s almost universal spin that martial arts results in long-term health as a core theme. Supporting this are some interesting statements on the topic by passed masters such as Itosu of the 1800s, Shito-ryu’s Mabuni, Asai of Shotokan who openly stated health may not go hand-in-hand with budo.

Understanding the pluses and minuses for certain ways of doing karate inside all of the styles from Shotokan, Goju to Shito-ryu, is key for many who have health as a central theme.

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